Category Archives: Scholarly Publishing

But Wait…There’s More!

Arriving in my mailbox on the same day as the other volume, A Companion to Custer and the Little Bighorn Campaign contains a long essay, “A National Monument,” that I researched and wrote in collaboration with a former UNL graduate advisee Jason Heppler. This  is another examination of history and memory in an important landscape in the American West similar to my earlier journal articles on sites in New Mexico and Arizona. In addition to using traditional research methods, Jason and I also employed Digital Humanities text analysis tools to investigate the topics and rhetoric contained in two of the three editions of the official interpretive handbook for the Little Bighorn battlefield National Monument site. I hope that students of the history of the United States, the American West, and History & Memory, along with those who are fascinated with the Native American experience and the mythic figure of George Armstrong Custer, will find this piece a welcome contribution to that voluminous historiography.

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This Just In…

What began as an invited lecture to speak to the faculty of Brigham Young University’s Religious Studies Center in Omaha, NE along the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail in the summer of 2012 has just been published! As the lead essay in this collection of twelve pieces, I trace the cartographic ideas of the Far West around the time of the Mormon exodus from Illinois to Utah in the mid-nineteenth century. The essay examines the significant works of cartography featuring the American West created just after the Lewis and Clark expedition through the constitution of the State of Deseret in 1849. These are the depictions of the region that Church leadership used to establish the stake of Zion, the settlement of the Great Basin, the proposed State of Deseret, the creation of Utah Territory, and eventually the state of Utah. I am pleased to see it in print and hope that it is of use to those who study cartography, Mormon history, the American West, and United States history.

NEH honors two Ball State projects

National Endowment for the Humanities names What Middletown Read, The Real Buffalo Bill as ‘top grant projects’

September 30, 2015

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has singled out two projects with Ball State University ties as among the most significant projects the agency has funded. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of its founding, the agency has selected what it describes as “the top grant projects from NEH’s history,” including What Middletown Read and The Real Buffalo Bill…

The Papers of William F. Cody, included in “The Real Buffalo Bill,” a series of NEH-supported projects that explore the life, legacy and impact of William “Buffalo Bill” Cody also made NEH’s list.  In his role as senior digital editor of the Papers of William F. Cody, Ball State’s Douglas Seefeldt, a history professor, has worked closely with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West on several projects, including The William F. Cody Archive and the Cody Studies digital research and scholarship platform. Ball State is one of the participating institutions.

Read more at: http://cms.bsu.edu/news/articles/2015/9/neh-honors-two-ball-state-projects

Link

The C-SPAN 3 broadcast of our panel discussion is now online :

The Enduring Legacy of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West

A roundtable discussion featuring Jeremy Johnston, Buffalo Bill Center of the West; Douglas Seefeldt, Ball State University; Frank Christianson, Brigham Young University; Michelle Delaney, Smithsonian Institution; and Riva Freifeld, Documentary Filmmaker. Fifty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Western History Association, Newport Beach, CA, October 17, 2014.